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General Surgery

Course prepares UF medical students for first year as surgical residents

Surgical residents face myriad challenges in the first weeks of their intern year as they transition from students to clinicians. “The hardest part about being an intern is that you don’t feel ready to be a doctor,” said George Sarosi, M.D., the Robert H. Hux Professor in the…

Atif Iqbal, M.D., appointed to national colorectal surgery committees

Atif Iqbal, M.D., an assistant professor of surgery at the UF College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery, has been selected as a surgical expert (three-year term, one term renewable by election) on the National Cancer Institute’s Rectal-Anal Task Force of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee. The GISC’s role…

UF surgery resident’s research earns recognition from American College of Surgeons

Ahsan Raza, M.D., a fifth-year general surgery resident at the University of Florida College of Medicine, has earned second place in a paper competition organized by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer. Raza’s paper is titled, “Variability in Radiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer Between Academic and Community Centers.”…

Faculty join UF College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery

Two surgeons have joined the faculty in the University of Florida’s College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery. Alexander L. Ayzengart, MD, MPH, FACS, is an assistant professor in the division of general surgery. He earned his medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor. Ayzengart…

Three UF department of surgery faculty promoted

Three faculty members at the UF College of Medicine’s Department of Surgery have received promotions. Steven Hughes, MD, chief of the division of general surgery and vice chair for the department of surgery, was promoted to professor. His clinical expertise is…

In the fight against sepsis, time means everything

In the world of sepsis treatment, the scale is vast and the cost is staggering. Every year, 258,000 people in the United States die from sepsis. Hundreds of thousands of others recover with treatment. Treating sepsis costs more than $20 billion a year, according to a 2013 federal report.

Blocking protein in blood may prevent sepsis in premature infants

UF Health researchers have found that blocking a certain protein in the blood with medication could help protect premature infants from sepsis, a common and sometimes deadly infection, according to a new study that combines findings from a mouse model and from premature infants.